Police, la migra and the trouble with Trump by Bear Guerra

Ruxandra's third "Letter from California" is out in High Country News, on the tricky dance Los Angeles' cops must do in order to stay in Latino engagement but out of immigration enforcement. Every month, she'll be chronicling efforts in the state to grapple with its role in the changing, modern West under a Trump presidency. 

Read the essay here. And in Spanish, here.

You're Invited: The Final Event for "Going Gray in LA" by Bear Guerra

In the coming decades, Los Angeles is going to look a lot grayer. A County’s senior population will doubl in the next 15 year. ousing, health care and the job market will have to adapt to a population that is working and living longer in a city built for the young. 

On Sunday, April 9th, 2017, join us at Los Angeles' Japanese American National Museum for a live conversation and exhibit documenting an 18-mile avenue stretch of Broadway, cutting through the working class heart of the city; from Lincoln Heights, into Chinatown, through Downtown, and on to South LA.

 

A Trip Through Ecuador’s Cofán Community  by Bear Guerra

Bear's collaboration with anthropologist Michael Cepek last year sees the light in this photo and print essay out in Pacific Standard Magazine:

"The more than 500 Cofán people who live in Dureno don’t fit most Western stereotypes of how native Amazonians are supposed to look or act. They don’t wear loincloths or paint their bodies. They don’t lounge around in hammocks and play wooden flutes all day... To most outsiders, the Cofán don’t look indigenous — they look poor and defeated."

"Going Gray in LA" moves down Broadway to Downtown by Bear Guerra

Our year-long multimedia collaboration with KCRW Public Radio, Going Gray in LA, continues this month with new stories about senior hunger, about Little Tokyo as a great example for aging in place, and about a man whose life changed when Fidel Castro came to power in 1959. Thank you to the Eisner Foundation for the support.