"Going Gray in LA" moves down Broadway to Downtown by Bear Guerra

Our year-long multimedia collaboration with KCRW Public Radio, Going Gray in LA, continues this month with new stories about senior hunger, about Little Tokyo as a great example for aging in place, and about a man whose life changed when Fidel Castro came to power in 1959. Thank you to the Eisner Foundation for the support.

Starting Over: An Essay by Bear Guerra

Our new written and photographic essay, part of our "Going Gray in LA" stories done in collaboration with KCRW, is up at The Virginia Quarterly Review: 

"When asked about why he moved to the US well into his fifties, Song says, 'I left China because there were some things I still wanted to do in my life, and I didn't want to admit I was too old for it.' Like so many immigrants before him, he had a vision of American as a magical place, 'almost like a paradise in the West.'"

 

Bringing LA's Chinatown and Little Tokyo together through Takachizu by Bear Guerra

On January 14th, we'll be joining a group of artists, storytellers and activists to host Takachizu: Staying Home.

The gathering in English, Cantonese and Japanese will feature photos, multimedia, food, conversation and personal stories about what it means to make a home in a big city like LA--and what it takes to stay there.

To listen/see our stories from Little Tokyo and Chinatown visit our Going Gray in L.A. website.

Bear's photos of Cofán indigenous community in American Ethnologist by Bear Guerra

The new issue of American Ethnologist (AE) is out with an article by our friend and collaborator Michael Cepek ("There Might Be Blood: Oil, Humility, and the Cosmopolitics of a Cofán Petro-Being") and a beautiful cover by Bear Guerra. The portrait of Alejandro Criollo was taken in the Cofán village of Dureno, Ecuador, earlier this year.